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Burke and Norfolk: Photographs from the war in Afghanistan
A security guard’s booth at the newly restored Ikhtiaruddin Citadel, Herat, 2010
40x53' from an edition of 7
© Simon Norfolk

Burke and Norfolk: Photographs from the war in Afghanistan

John Burke » Simon Norfolk »

Exhibition: – 18 Jun 2011

Michael Hoppen Gallery

124-128 Barlby Road
W10 6BL London

+44 (0)20-73523649


www.michaelhoppengallery.com

by appt

Burke and Norfolk: Photographs from the war in Afghanistan
A dumping ground for an abandoned Russian-era bomber that has now been incorporated into the car park of ‘Shamshad TV’, a new media company supported heavily by American money. Kabul, 2010
40x53" from an edition of 7
© Simon Norfolk

Burke + Norfolk: Photographs from the war in Afghanistan
13th May - 18th June 2011

“Burke is an enigma; working with him was like looking for a man amongst shadows. He left no diaries or records, unlike other Imperial photographers from the same generation. There are no photographs of him. In a couple of sketches we see him from behind, but never his face; that has to be more than just reticence, surely?”  Simon Norfolk

Michael Hoppen Contemporary is pleased to present a new series of photographs by Simon Norfolk, commissioned by Tate Modern.  In the autumn of 2010 Simon Norfolk began a photographic project in Afghanistan, taking its cue from the work of nineteenth century British photographer John Burke.  Norfolk’s images reimagine or respond to Burke’s Afghan war scenes in the context of the contemporary conflict. A symbiotic project, Norfolk takes references from Burke’s original portfolios.

John Burke (1843-1900) was the first ever photographer to make pictures in Afghanistan. He accompanied British forces during the invasion that became the Second Anglo-Afghan War from 1878-1880 producing a small number of albums of prints for sale to the general public. These were sold through his studios in Rawalpindi, Peshawar and the summertime mountain retreat of Muree in a region which is now Pakistan but at the time was the borderlands of British Imperial India.

This exhibition follows from Norfolk’s exhibition at Tate Modern from 6 May – 10 July.

All images © Simon Norfolk

Burke and Norfolk: Photographs from the war in Afghanistan
Jaw Aka Faizal Nahman and his daughter Nono from Bamiyan province, now living in an improvised plastic shelter in the ruined gardens of Darulaman  Palace. Built in the 1920s to house an Afghan parliament, 'Darul Aman'  translates as 'abode of peace'. Kabul, 2010
40x53" from an edition of 7
© Simon Norfolk
Burke and Norfolk: Photographs from the war in Afghanistan
Some of the nonsensical property development taking place in Kabul. This district of the city, Karte Char Chateh, is remembered by Kabulis as that part of the bazaar which was burned by the British in 1842 as collective punishment for the killing of the British Envoy. The fires still burned when the British retreated two days later. Kabul, 2010 40x53" from an edition of 7
Burke and Norfolk: Photographs from the war in Afghanistan
A view of Kabul City from Bala Burj, 2011
40x53" from an edition of 7
© Simon Norfolk