Hier können Sie die Auswahl einschränken.
Wählen Sie einfach die verschiedenen Kriterien aus.

eNews

X





Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Peace Image of the Year 2021
Maggie Shannon, Joy 2021, from the series Extreme pain, but also extreme joy
© Maggie Shannon/ Global Peace Photo Award

Global Peace Photo Award 2021

Nate Hofer » Derrick Ofosu Boateng » Maggie Shannon » Snezhana von Büdingen » Shabana Zahir »

Award:

Tue 21 Sep

GLOBAL PEACE PHOTO AWARD

Dumbagasse 9
2500 Baden

+43 (0)699-13583989


www.friedaward.com

Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Maggie Shannon, from the series Extreme pain, but also extreme joy
© Maggie Shannon/ Global Peace Photo Award

The main Peace Image of the Year 2021 prize of 10,000 euros went to American photographer Maggie Shannon for her reportage on home births in Los Angeles during the first lockdown in spring 2020.
The hospitals are flooded with covid patients. In the maternity wards spouses are not allowed. Many women want to give birth at home. Without mask, with the fathers. They are afraid of the hospitals. They are in panic. The midwifes receive emergency calls. In this situation Margaret Shannon decides to accompany four of these midwives. She is impressed with the calm and decisiveness of these women. With their experience. And she is elated by those moments when all the pain has been overcome and the private happiness simply drowns out all the knowledge of the global pandemic. Bodily contact in times of a contact ban! New life in times of the big death. Holding close. Embracing. Helping. A father kissing his new-born, almost as if lost in prayer. It is a picture of a deep peace in a time of thousands of unpeaceful events. And in addition like a small pointer to Black Lives Matter, in a country that in 2020 was still governed by a president specializing in unpeace, in tantrums, gloating, contempt and slander.

The best peace image in the children's and youth category, Children's Peace Image of the Year 2021, worth 1000 euros, was won by 7-year-old Aadhyaa Aravind Shankar.
This picture shows her mother resting in the lap of her reading mother. Both women are framed by plants that provide freshness. From outside a cooling breeze comes in. Whether still a child or long grown up, Aadhyaa is convinced: Everyone finds peace in such moments. Finds safety and relaxation. Has an opportunity to forget all hardship.


The award winners and their stories:

Nate Hofer: "One and a half acres"
American photographer Nate Hofer looks through the eye of his camera drone with great joy on this version of "swords to ploughshares". A transition from military to civil. They look peaceful, these rectangular pieces of landscape in the American Midwest. Farming land, parking for scrapped cars, area of wild growth, church square, forest, harvesting yard. But beneath them used to be hidden what could once have brought the death of millions: 450 launching platforms for intercontinental ballistic missiles, aimed at the Soviet Union. They were constructed from 1962 onwards. In Missouri, in Montana, in South and North Dakota. Mostly far from larger settlements. And far enough north to be able to reach not only Russia but also China. A massive potential threat in Cold War times. The end for these platforms of destruction came when US president George W. Bush and Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev managed to agree in 1991 on the so-called START treaty: an agreement to at least reduce their nuclear weapons arsenal. Once the missile launch facilities had been dismantled, the land was sold back to the farmers, sometimes for 600, sometimes for 12 000 US dollars.

Shabana Zahir: "Our journey"
In a very direct way, a young woman, so far completely unknown in the photography community, has translated her thoughts and feelings into pictures. It is Shabana Zahir, born in 1998 in Baghlan in northern Afghanistan. Her father left the family when she was very young. When she was 16, her mother decided to flee the war with Shabana and two siblings. To set out for peace. Shabana Zahir. In Farsi her surname means "belonging to the night". It was at night that her flight began. It lasted for months. Across borders, barbed wire, mountains. Afghanistan, Iraq, Turkey. In Turkey Shabana worked as a waitress in a small restaurant and learned the language. Then she came to Greece on a boat. In the hope of getting to Western Europe, to Germany, along the route through the Balkans. A hope so far dashed. The refugee camp of Diavata near Thessaloniki. Two years of agony. Feeling wordless and useless. Until the small NGO Una mano per un Sorriso, a hand for a smile, introduced Shabana to photography. To a new way of expressing herself. To speaking in pictures.

Derrick Ofusu Boateng: "Peace and Strength"
Derrick Ofusu Boateng from Ghana is someone who loves Africa and its cultures. Who does not agree with our solidified image of Africa from news and films. He is someone who wants to emphatically celebrate the strength of the Africans. Their poetry. So he set out with his mobile camera, quite simply, as he says. Of course, he composes his pictures. Uses colour generously. Wants beauty. Wants a personal victory over the everyday struggle. He celebrates play. He photographs and paints at the same time. He celebrates pride. He celebrates lightness. For the jury of the Global Peace Photo Award, Derrick Ofusu Boateng, who decided against becoming a doctor or a lawyer, stands for a whole generation of young African photographers who teach us not to make ourselves comfortable in our traditional ideas of Africa. And not to forget that, beyond South Sudan and Boko Haram in Nigeria and war in Yemen and corruption in Tanzania, there is another Africa whose people dream of exactly the same things as we do: the big freedom to be carefree and live in harmony.

Snezhana von Büdingen: "Meeting Sofie"
Snezhana von Büdingen who was born in Perm in Russia and lives in Bonn got to know Sofie in autumn 2017, at the home of the girl, then 18 years old, a farmstead dating back to the 16th century in the village of Eilenstedt in the federal land of Sachsen-Anhalt. A fairy-tale garden, a house full of antiques and old paintings. It is like out of a different era, says the photographer, dreamy, harmonic, full of peace. And in it this special young woman. Self-assured, at peace with herself, who likes pretty clothes, is in love with a young man, gripped by lovesickness, secure in her family. In transition from child to adult, with all that entails in searching and trying things out and small dramas. Snezhana von Büdingen at first documented the intimate love between mothers and their children with Down syndrome in a series of portraits taken in a studio in Cologne. But the vitality and diversity of her intimate long-term project with Sofie makes her hope to take down the "imaginary boundaries" between us and the life of the others. Boundaries made of "prejudices and ignorance". We people, she says, "definitely need more acceptance, more integration, more love." And she recognizes herself in Sofie. In Sofie’s need for freedom and rebellion, too, which alternates with quiet and almost magical moments.

16.396 images from 114 countries were submitted to the Global Peace Photo Award 2021. Most of the entries came from India, Russia, USA, Germany and Iran. The entries were judged by a prestigious international jury consisting of photographers, journalists and representatives of photo associations.

The Global Peace Photo Award is organized by Edition Lammerhuber in partnership with Photographische Gesellschaft (PHG), UNESCO, the Austrian Parliament, the Austrian Parliamentary Reporting Association, the International Press Institute (IPI), the German Youth Photography Award and the World Press Photo Foundation.

The Award is inspired by Austrian pacifist and author Alfred Hermann Fried (* 11 November 1864, Vienna; † 4 May 1921, Vienna). As founder of the journal Die Waffen nieder! (Lay down your arms!) and other peace activities, Fried received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1911, together with Tobias Michael Carel Asser (* 28 April 1838, Amsterdam; † 29 July 1913, The Hague), organizer of the first International The Hague Peace Conference and instigator of the Permanent Court of Arbitration. 

Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Children’s Peace Image of the Year 2021: Aadhyaa Aravind Shankar, Lap of Peace (Im Schoß des Friedens)
© Aadhyaa Aravind Shankar/ Global Peace Photo Award

Maggie Shannon beim Global Peace Photo Award 2021 für das "Friedensbild des Jahres" ausgezeichnet. Die amerikanische Fotografin siegt mit einem Bild aus ihrer Reportage "Extreme pain, but also extreme joy" über Hausgeburten in den USA während der Pandemie.

Wien, 21. September 2021 – am Abend wurden zum neunten Mal die Gewinner des internationalen Fotowettbewerbs Global Peace Photo Award mit der Alfred-Fried-Friedensmedaille ausgezeichnet:

Nate Hofer für "One and a half acres (6000 Quadratmeter)"
Shabana Zahir für "Our journey (Unsere Reise)"
Derrick Ofusu Boateng für "Peace and Strength (Friede und Stärke)"
Snezhana von Büdingen für "Meeting Sofie (Begegnungen mit Sofie)"
Maggie Shannon für "Extreme pain, but also extreme joy (Großer Schmerz und große Freude)".

Der mit 10 000 Euro dotierte Hauptpreis Peace Image of the Year 2021 ging an die amerikanische Fotografin Maggie Shannon für ihre Reportage über Hausgeburten in Los Angeles während des ersten Lockdowns im Frühjahr 2020.

Die Hospitäler sind mit Corona-Patienten geflutet. In den Geburtsstationen dürfen Ehemänner nicht anwesend sein. Viele Frauen möchten ihr Kind zuhause auf die Welt bringen. Ohne Maske, mit den Vätern. Sie haben Angst vor den Krankenhäusern. Sie sind in Panik. Bei den Hebammen gehen Alarmanrufe ein. In dieser Situation entschließt sich Margaret Shannon, vier dieser Geburtshelferinnen zu begleiten. Sie ist beeindruckt von der Ruhe und Entschlossenheit dieser Frauen. Von ihrer Erfahrung. Und sie ist begeistert von jenen Momenten, in denen aller Schmerz überwunden ist und das private Glücksgefühl das Wissen um die weltweite Pandemie einfach hinwegschwemmt. Körperkontakt in Zeiten der Kontaktsperre! Neues Leben in Zeiten des großen Sterbens. Das Festhalten. Das Umarmen. Das Helfen. Ein Vater, der sein Neugeborenes küsst, fast wie im Gebet versunken. Es ist das Bild von einem tiefen Frieden in Zeiten der abertausend unfriedlichen Ereignisse. Und nebenbei wie ein kleiner Hinweis auf Black Lives Matter in einem Land, das 2020 noch von einem Präsidenten regiert wurde, der auf den Unfrieden spezialisiert war, auf Wutausbrüche, Häme, Verachtung und Verunglimpfung.

Das mit 1000 Euro dotierte beste Friedensbild in der Kinder- und Jugendkategorie, Children’s Peace Image of the Year 2021, gewann die 7-jährige Aadhyaa Aravind Shankar.

Ihr Foto, "Lap of Peace (Im Schoß des Friedens)" zeigt Aadhyaas Mutter, die im Schoße ihrer lesenden Mutter ruht. Die beiden Frauen sind flankiert von Pflanzen, die Frische spenden. Und es weht von draußen eine kühlende Luft. Ob nun noch Kind oder längst erwachsen; Aadhyaa ist überzeugt: Jeder Mensch finde Frieden in solchen Momenten. Finde Sicherheit und Entspannung. Habe die Chance, alle Nöte zu vergessen.


Die Preisträgerinnen und Preisträger und ihre Geschichten:

Nate Hofer: "One and a half acres"
In Drohnenaufnahmen zeigt der amerikanische Fotograf zeigt seine Version von "Schwerter zu Pflugscharen". Eine Verwandlung des Militärischen ins Zivile: Friedlich sehen sie aus, diese rechteckigen Flecken in der Landschaft des us-amerikanischen mittleren Westens. Bauernland, Parkplatz für ausrangierte Autos, Wildwuchsareal, Kirchenvorplatz, Wald, Erntehof. Darunter aber war verborgen, was einst millionenfachen Tod hätte bringen können: 450 Abschussrampen für atomar bestückte Interkontinental-Raketen, gerichtet auf die Sowjetunion. Das Ende dieser Vernichtungs-Rampen war gekommen, als sich der US-Präsident George W. Bush und der sowjetische Präsident Michail Gorbatschow 1991 auf das sogenannte START-Abkommen einigen konnten: eine Übereinkunft, ihr Atomwaffenarsenal wenigstens zu reduzieren. Nach der Demontage der Raketen-Silos wurde das Land an Bauern zurückverkauft, mal für 600, mal für 12 000 US-Dollar.

Shabana Zahir: "Our journey"
Auf eine sehr direkte Weise hat eine in der Fotografie-Szene bislang noch gänzlich unbekannte, aus Afghanistan stammende, junge Frau ihre Gedanken und Gefühle in Bilder übersetzt. Ihr Nachname bedeutet übersetzt aus dem Farsi: zur Nacht gehörend. In einer Nacht hat ihre Flucht begonnen. Die Flucht hat Monate gedauert. Über Grenzen, Stacheldrähte, Berge. Afghanistan, Irak, Türkei. In der Türkei hat Shabana als Kellnerin in einem kleinen Restaurant gearbeitet, hat die Landessprache erlernt. Dann kam sie in einem Boot nach Griechenland. In der Hoffnung, über die Balkan-Route nach Westeuropa, nach Deutschland zu gelangen. Eine bislang vergebliche Hoffnung. Das Flüchtlingslager Diavata nahe Thessaloniki. Zwei Jahre lang Agonie. Das Gefühl der Wortlosigkeit und Nutzlosigkeit. Bis die kleine NGO "Una mano per un Sorriso", "eine Hand für ein Lächeln", Shabana zur Fotografie brachte. Zu einer neuen Möglichkeit, sich auszudrücken. In Bildern zu sprechen.

Derrick Ofusu Boateng: "Peace and Strength"
Der aus Ghana stammende Fotograf ist einer, der Afrika und seine Kulturen liebt. Der nicht einverstanden ist mit unserem verfestigten Afrika-Bild in Nachrichten und Filmen. Er ist einer, der mit Emphase die Kräfte der Afrikaner feiern will. Ihre Poesie. So ist er mit seiner Handy-Kamera losgezogen, einfach ganz einfach, wie er sagt. Natürlich komponiert er. Nutzt Farbe verschwenderisch. Will Schönheit. Will einen persönlichen Sieg über die Mühen der Ebene. Er feiert das Spielen. Er fotografiert und malt zugleich. Er feiert den Stolz. Er feiert die Leichtigkeit. Für die Jury des Global Peace Photo Awards steht Derrick Ofusu Boateng, der sich dagegen entschieden hat, Arzt oder Anwalt zu werden, für eine ganze Generation junger afrikanischer Fotografen, die uns lehren, es uns nicht in unseren tradierten Vorstellungen von Afrika zu bequem zu machen. Und nicht zu vergessen, dass es jenseits von Südsudan und Boko Haram in Nigeria und Krieg im Jemen und Korruption in Tansania noch ein Afrika gibt, dessen Menschen sich exakt das erträumen, was auch wir uns erträumen: die große Freiheit, unbeschwert sein zu dürfen und in Harmonie zu leben.

Snezhana von Büdingen: "Meeting Sofie"
Die in Russland geborene und in Deutschland lebende Fotografin hat Sofie im Herbst 2017 kennengelernt, im Zuhause des damals 18-jährigen Mädchens, einem Gutshof aus dem 16. Jahrhundert im Dorf Eilenstedt im Bundesstaat Sachsen-Anhalt. Ein märchenhafter Garten, ein Haus voller Antiquitäten und alter Gemälde. Wie aus einer anderen Zeit sei es dort, sagt die Fotografin, verträumt, harmonisch, voller Frieden. Und darin diese besondere junge Frau. Selbstbewusst, mit sich selber im Einklang, schönen Kleidern zugetan, in einen jungen Mann verliebt, von Liebeskummer erfasst, in der Familie geborgen. Vom Kind zur Erwachsenen werdend – mit allem, was an Suche und Ausprobieren und kleinen Dramen dazugehört. Snezhana von Büdingen hat die innige Liebe zwischen Müttern und ihren Kindern mit Down-Syndrom zunächst in einer Porträt-Reihe dokumentiert, aufgenommen in einem Kölner Studio. Die ganze Vitalität und Vielfalt ihres innigen Langzeitprojekts mit Sofie aber lässt sie noch mehr hoffen, "imaginäre Grenzen" zwischen uns und dem Leben der anderen niederreißen zu können. Die Grenzen aus "Vorurteilen und Ignoranz". Denn wir Menschen, sagt sie, "brauchen unbedingt mehr Akzeptanz, mehr Integration, mehr Liebe". Und auch sie selber erkenne sich in Sofie wieder. Auch in Sofies Bedürfnis nach Freiheit und Rebellion, das sich abwechselt mit den stillen und fast magischen Momenten.

Zum Global Peace Photo Award 2021 wurden 16.396 Bilder aus 114 Ländern eingereicht. Die meisten Einreichungen kamen aus Indien, Russland, USA, Deutschland und dem Iran.
Juriert wurden die Einreichungen von einer hochkarätigen, internationalen Jury bestehend aus Fotografen, Blattmachern und Repräsentanten von Fotoverbänden.

Der Global Peace Photo Award wird in Kooperation von Photographischer Gesellschaft (PHG), Edition Lammerhuber, UNESCO, Österreichischem Parlament, der Vereinigung der Parlamentsredakteurinnen und -redakteure, des Internationalen Press Institute (IPI), des Deutschen Jugendfotopreises und der World Press Photo Foundation ausgelobt.

Inspiriert wurde der Preis von dem österreichischen Pazifisten und Schriftsteller Alfred Hermann Fried (* 11. November 1864 in Wien; † 4. Mai 1921 in Wien). Fried wurde 1911 gemeinsam mit dem Organisator der Haager Konferenz für Internationales Privatrecht Tobias Asser der Friedensnobelpreis verliehen.

www.friedaward.com

Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Nate Hofer: from the series "One and a half acres"
© Nate Hofer/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Shabana Zahir from the series„Our journey“
© Shabana Zahir/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Derrick Ofusu Boateng, from the series „Peace and Strength“
© Derrick Ofusu Boateng/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Snezhana von Büdingen, from the series "Meeting Sofie"
© Snezhana von Büdingen/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Maggie Shannon, from the series Extreme pain, but also extreme joy
© Maggie Shannon/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Maggie Shannon, from the series Extreme pain, but also extreme joy
© Maggie Shannon/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Nate Hofer: from the series "One and a half acres"
© Nate Hofer/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Shabana Zahir from the series„Our journey“
© Shabana Zahir/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Derrick Ofusu Boateng, from the series „Peace and Strength“
© Derrick Ofusu Boateng/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Snezhana von Büdingen, from the series "Meeting Sofie"
© Snezhana von Büdingen/ Global Peace Photo Award
Global Peace Photo Award 2021
Snezhana von Büdingen, from the series "Meeting Sofie"
© Snezhana von Büdingen/ Global Peace Photo Award